The gigantic structure, nicknamed King Ghidorah, has been identified 5.5 billion light-years from Earth.

Some 5.5 billion light-years away, a team of Japanese astronomers has discovered a new supercluster of galaxies. It is one of the most massive ever identified: its main structure has 10,000 trillion times the mass of the Sun. Despite this, it is still not as much as Lainakea, to which the Milky Way belongs, which has 100,000 trillion solar masses.

  At the center, the King Ghidorah galaxy supercluster and, at the edges, the 19 galaxy clusters linked to it.  The Moon appears in a corner to compare the size of the structure in real scale.  Photo: NOAH

At the center, the King Ghidorah galaxy supercluster and, at the edges, the 19 galaxy clusters linked to it. The Moon appears in a corner to compare the size of the structure in real scale. Photo: NOAH

named as King Ghidorah Named after a fictional monster from Japanese movies, the Galaxy Supercluster contains at least 19 associated galaxy clusters, spread over an area of ​​the sky roughly the size of 15 full Moons. The finding has been published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Galaxy clusters, groupings of millions of galaxies, are one of the largest structures in the universe. The Milky Way, for example, is located within Virgo, but at the same time it is part of an even larger grouping: the Lainakea galactic supercluster.

Although superclusters extend over an area of ​​about 100 megaparsecs (about 500 times the size of the Milky Way), their definition itself remains ambiguous. Meanwhile, her true nature and what happens inside her remain shrouded in mystery.

The King Ghidorah Galactic Supercluster

The Subaru Telescope’s Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC), an instrument operated by the National Astronomy Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), surveyed the cosmos in an area equivalent to 4,400 times the apparent size of the full Moon and to a depth reaching more than 10,000 million light years. The high-quality imaging data obtained with this program is currently the best resource for searching for unknown superclusters of galaxies, they report in a statement.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *